THE LI WOOD CARVERS SHOW


Saturday, April 13, 2019

Meetings Planned 2019





May Reg Meeting - 5/14 Open Carving Night - 5/15
June Reg Meeting - 6/11 Open Carving Night - 6/19
September Reg Meeting - 9/10 Open Carving Night - 9/18
October Reg Meeting - 10/8 Open Carving Night - 10/16
November Reg Meeting - 11/12 Open Carving Night - 11/20
December Reg Meeing - 12/10 Open Carving Night - 12/18

Thursday, January 17, 2019

How to Carve Tagua Nuts

Instructions by Michelle Wood, Jewelry-Making Expert, Exclusively for Fire Mountain Gems and Beads®
D11R

: : : Materials : : :

STEP 1
Secure tagua nut bead in C-clamp. With non-dominant hand, hold clamp in place on flat work surface.
STEP 2
Using firm pressure, carve relief patterns in the dyed surface of the nut bead with microcarving tools.
Note: Use caution as micro-carving tools are extremely sharp. Always carve with tool moving away from your hands and body.
Have a question regarding this project? Email Customer Service.

Copyright Permissions

Permission to copy this instruction sheet is granted for non-commercial educational purposes only. All other reproduction requires written permission. Please email copyrightpermission@firemtn.com for more information.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Is Black Pepper Better Than Styptic Pencil for Cut?



Do you have a favorite home remedy to stop bleeding? Many people insist that pouring ground black pepper on a cut stops the bleeding more quickly. Is black pepper better than other approaches to stopping bleeding?


Black Pepper Better Remedy for Bleeding:

Q. Yesterday I cut my bottom lip shaving and it would not stop bleeding. I used a styptic pencil several times with no success. No way I could stop it.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

OPEN CARVING IS BACK IN N. MASSAPEQUA

We have Open Carving at our Albany Ave address again!!!

Reminder we are now at:


North Massapequa Community Center

214 N Albany Ave, Massapequa, NY 11758

HOPE WE SEE YOU THERE...
 

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Oiling Spoons!

by  Robert Pridgen, website click here






I enjoy carving spoons and other small kitchen ware and commonly use walnut oil as a finish, but I don’t make these items frequently or in large batches.   I know that many who do use some sort of soak tank to immerse their woodenware for a prolonged immersion in the oil of their choice.  In my case, however, such a setup is impractical and requires a large amount of oil.  Since I may do a piece every month or two, I needed a system that allowed me to immerse the piece in oil without requiring a tank or a gallon of oil.

My solution?